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Diploma in Hadith and Sunnah Studies – Introduction to Major Books of Hadith

Hadith and Sunnah Studies – Major Books of Hadith_Folder_Small

 Overview

Diploma in Hadith and Sunnah Studies aims to introduce students to different aspects of the hadith sciences. It will explain: the methodology used by traditionalists to authenticate hadiths; the practice of hadith study:travelling for hadith; taking notes; reading and hearing; and the compilation of hadith compendia; adducing and juxtaposing hadith texts to inform understanding of the religion as practice (norms and laws); the increasing sophistication of hadith criticism; and the gradual predominance of hadith texts as a record of the Prophetic Sunnah. These aspects of the hadith sciences will be studied with reference primarily to al-Muwatta, and the six compendia that have, over centuries, retained the widest acceptance among the Muslim community.

Who is it for ?

This course is suitable for students and scholars who wish to have an in depth overview of each of the major books of hadith in Islam. The course compares and contrasts the purpose and methodology of the authors to show how brilliant they were in their works as well as giving biographical account including anecdotal gems from the lives of these important imams of islam.


Modules

  • Muwaṭṭa – First Major Collection of Hadith
  • Ṣaḥīḥ al-Bukhārī – The Abridged Collection of Authentic Hadith with Connected Chains – Part 1
  • Ṣaḥīḥ al-Bukhārī – The Abridged Collection of Authentic Hadith with Connected Chains – Part 2
  • Ṣaḥīḥ Muslim – Hadith Collection with Authentic Chains
  • Sunan Abī Dāwūd – One of The Six Canonical Hadith Collections
  • Sunan at-Tirmidhī – One of The Six Canonical Hadith Collections
  • Sunan an-Nasā’ī – One of The Six Canonical Hadith Collections
  • Sunan Ibn Mājah – One of The Six Canonical Hadith Collections






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Course Structure

Start Date : 6th of May 2017

[This Diploma is part of Term-1 : Diploma in Essential Islamic Sciences – Level 3]

  • Duration – 5 months
  • 16 Lessons – One lesson per week
  • Each lesson – 3 hours in duration
  • Prerecorded lectures
  • Lectures – Every Saturday 7:00pm
  • Live Tutorial – Once every 2 weeks
  • Exam- End of the Course
  • Certification provided upon the successful completion of exam
  • 120 hours of lectures + 20 hours of live tutorials

Course Timetable

(All Module lectures are delivered via our online Learning Management System)

 Module

Lesson 1 & 2]

Lesson 3 & 4]

 Live Tutorial

Muwaṭṭa – First Major Collection of Hadith  6th May 2017  13th May 2017  See LMS
Ṣaḥīḥ al-Bukhārī – The Abridged Collection of Authentic Hadith with Connected Chains – Part 1  20th May 2017  27th May 2017  See LMS
Ṣaḥīḥ al-Bukhārī – The Abridged Collection of Authentic Hadith with Connected Chains – Part 2  3rd Jun 2017  10th Jun 2017  See LMS
Ṣaḥīḥ Muslim – Hadith Collection with Authentic Chains  17th Jun 2017  24th Jun 2017  See LMS
Sunan Abī Dāwūd – One of The Six Canonical Hadith Collections  1st Jul 2017  8th Jul 2017  See LMS
Sunan at-Tirmidhī – One of The Six Canonical Hadith Collections  15th Jul 2017  22nd Jul 2017  See LMS
Sunan an-Nasā’ī – One of The Six Canonical Hadith Collections  29th Jul 2017 5th Aug 2017  See LMS
Sunan Ibn Mājah – One of The Six Canonical Hadith Collections  12th Aug 2017  19th Aug 2017  See LMS

Course Outline

Module 1 – Muwaṭṭa – First Major Collection of Hadith

Mālik ibn Anas (93-179 AH)
Although not counted among the six, this is the earliest book of hadith and fiqh, and attributed to Imam Malik. It has always has been approved and revered, both for its authentic hadiths and as a record of the sunnahs of the people of Madinah.We will cover the history of the text in its major recensions; its most important general features, including how the material is arranged and classified and why some of it is left unclassified; what is excluded from it that could have been included; other, contemporary approaches (in Egypt, Syria, Iraq), to hadith and fiqh; and an overview of the differences between the Madinan and Iraqi approaches to the recording and application of hadith.

Module 2 – Ṣaḥīḥ al-Bukhārī – The Abridged Collection of Authentic Hadith with Connected Chains – Part 1

Muhammad ibn Ismā‘īl al-Bukhārī (195-256 AH)

This Sahih is revered among Muslims as the most authentic book after the Quran. We will study a few hadiths in great detail to demonstrate how thoroughly and consistently Bukhariapplied his criteria for authenticating the chain of narrators reporting the hadith; how detached he was from any considerations of sect and creed; his estimation of sound hadiths as being sufficient to guide the practice of Islam; and the method, and meaning for fiqh, of his notes and chapter headings. This compendium has been extensively commented on, most famously by Ibn Hajar al-`Asqalani in Fath al-bari.

 

Module 3 –Ṣaḥīḥ al-Bukhārī – The Abridged Collection of Authentic Hadith with Connected Chains – Part 2

Muhammad ibn Ismā‘īl al-Bukhārī (195-256 AH)

This Sahih is revered among Muslims as the most authentic book after the Quran. We will study a few hadiths in great detail to demonstrate how thoroughly and consistently Bukhariapplied his criteria for authenticating the chain of narrators reporting the hadith; how detached he was from any considerations of sect and creed; his estimation of sound hadiths as being sufficient to guide the practice of Islam; and the method, and meaning for fiqh, of his notes and chapter headings. This compendium has been extensively commented on, most famously by Ibn Hajar al-`Asqalani in Fath al-bari.

Module 4 – Ṣaḥīḥ Muslim – Hadith Collection with Authentic Chains

Muslim ibn al-Hajjāj an-Naysābūrī (204-261 AH)

The Sahihof Muslim has been served by several commentaries, notably those of Qadi `Iyad and Imam al-Nawawi. However, these commentaries are mainly concerned with matn not isnad, and in important respects they failed to understand the methodology and technical critique deployed by Muslim in his selection and arrangement of hadiths. Accordingly, neither was able to defend Muslim’s work against criticisms of what he included or excluded. Also, both commentaries added chapter divisions and headings– something that Muslim himself did not do – and, in doing so, they preferred an argument that suits the thinking (and needs) of jurists rather than hadith specialists and, secondly, altered the priorities that Muslim accorded to certain narratives over others.Our presentation will show the wisdom of Muslim’s own ordering of the material and its methodology.

Module 5 – Sunan Abī Dāwūd – One of The Six Canonical Hadith Collections

Abū Dāwūd Al-Sijistani (202-275 AH)

Abu Dawud cites some hadiths not recorded by Bukhari and Muslim. He adds notes to some of the hadiths, declaring them to be weak; while all others are salih. He believed that unless there was formal proof of untrustworthiness against a particular narrator, traditions through him should be recorded and circulated. His collection was approved by Ibn Hanbal. Abu Dawud’simportant contribution to the field of the Sunnah and his methodology in this work will be explained,notably in the light of his letter to the people of Makkah. The course will also look at the meaning of sunnah, the historical development of the concept, and counterthe claim of some orientalists that sunnahs evolved from customary tribal laws.

 

Module 6 – Sunan at-Tirmidhī – One of The Six Canonical Hadith Collections

Muḥammad Ibn ‘Īsá At-Tirmidhī (209-279 AH)

Al-Tirmidhi’s method was to begin with mention of the hadith related to the heading, give his opinion of the status of that hadith, refer to other relevant hadiths and, after, that, mention the opinions of different jurists. At the end of his collection, is appended Kitab al-`Ilal. In it Tirmidhi explains his classification of hadith according to the reliability of their routes of transmission andother criteria. We will also discuss how Tirmidhi presents differences among the jurists’ arguments, and how the traditionists dealt with the technical minutiae related to isnad or matn.Tirmidhi also famously put together a collection of hadiths that record the personal characteristics and virtues of the Prophet, sallal-llahu `alayhiwa-sallam, which is known as Kitab al-Shama’il.

 

Module 7 – Sunan an-Nasā’ī – One of The Six Canonical Hadith Collections

Aḥmad Ibn Shu’ayb al-Nasā’ī (214-303 AH)

This compendium of hadiths is generally considered third in strength of the six books. Nasa’i gives more space to the `ibadat than in the other collections, and has chapters on forms of bequest and donation not found in the others, though the relevant hadiths are there. On the other hand, his Sunanlacks a number of the chapter divisions (such as on the Qur’an and the fitnas) found in the others.

 

Module 8 – Sunan Ibn Mājah – One of The Six Canonical Hadith Collections

Muḥammad Ibn Yazīd Ibn Mājah (209-273 AH)

This Sunan is considered as the last of the six works in respect of the authenticity of its chains of narrators. We will explain the status of this work, the methodology of Ibn Majah and the criticism that has been made against it.Particular emphasis will be given to Ibn Majah’s own arguments, as presented in the famousMuqaddimahhe wrote for this book.


Diploma in Hadith and Sunnah Studies – Introduction to Major Books of Hadith

Diploma in Hadith and Sunnah Studies – Introduction to Major Books of Hadith

Course Fees:

Full payment – £399 
Monthly Subscription – 4 x £99 

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